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Lake Fork Texas
Fishing Lake Fork Texas
 
Information provided by the Texas Department of Wildlife

Largemouth bass are the most popular sportfish on Lake Fork Reservoir. A combination of restrictive harvest regulations, stocking of Florida strain largemouth bass, and good habitat has contributed to Lake Fork's development as one of the country's premier trophy bass lakes. More than 65% of the Texas Top 50 largest bass, including the current state record, were caught from Lake Fork. Crappie fishing is generally good, especially in standing timber and under the lake's numerous bridges. Channel catfish provide an excellent sport fishery, though this remains a well-kept secret. Sunfish, primarily bluegill, offer additional angling opportunities during spring and summer.

FISHING COVER/STRUCTURE
Flooded timber is found throughout Lake Fork and provides excellent fish habitat. Although access through the reservoir is provided by numerous buoyed boat lanes, submerged timber represents a substantial hazard, so care should be exercised while boating in all areas. Areas containing hydrilla, boat houses and docks, and lake points have historically provided some of the best fishing for largemouth bass.

FISHING TIPS AND TACTICS
Largemouth bass anglers are most successful on this reservoir during the spring, fall, and winter months. Spinnerbaits, plastic worms and lizards, jigs and jerk baits are all popular baits during peak fishing in the spring (mid-February to April) when fishing is concentrated along the shoreline for spawning fish. Nightime fishing during the hot summer months can be very productive and a good way to beat the Texas heat. At this time, plastic worms, spinnerbaits, crankbaits and topwaters are often used. During late summer and early fall, when fish are schooling, crankbaits and topwater lures can be very effective. In winter jigging spoons, jigs and crankbaits are most productive.

Crappie anglers concentrate their efforts in deep water near the dam during the winter months. In late spring and early fall, most angler fish for crappie under the bridges (Highway 154, Highway 515, CR 2946 and CR 514). Live minnows and crappie jigs are among the most popular baits used. The catfish population is dominated by channel catfish, but also includes flathead catfish. Stinkbait and cutbait work well for channel cats, while live bait is preferred for flatheads. Anglers occasionally catch large blue catfish.

Sunfish such as bluegill and redear can be caught in early summer, in shallow water, using crickets, earthworms and small spinners. During the remainder of the year they can be caught using the same baits around piers, boathouses and submerged humps.

Location: On the Sabine River in Hopkins, Rains and Wood Counties, 5 miles northwest of Quitman

Size: 27,680 acres

Maximum Depth: 70 feet

Date Impounded: 1980

Normal Water Clarity: Moderately clear

Water Level Fluctuation: Moderate, 2-4 ft.

Conservation Pool Elevation: 403 ft. msl
Current Water Levels

Aquatic Vegetation: Hydrilla, Eurasian milfoil, coontail, American lotus, water primrose, water hyacinth and pennywort

ACCESS/CAMPING
The Sabine River Authority (903) 878-2262 operates four public boat ramps and a free day use area. There are also numerous privately-owned access and accommodation facilities in the immediate vicinity of the lake. Accommodations range from motels and cabins to RV sites and tent camping. Individual facilities include services such as bait and tackle shops, convenience stores, fishing piers, gas pumps, and restaurants.

MAPS
A small map is available free of charge from the Sabine River Authority. A number of good topographic maps are sold by local businesses. Online topographic maps are also available.

 
 
 
 
 


 

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