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  • Minnesota Outdoor News



    A popular pastime that's a backyard boon for Minnesota
    Location: Minnesota


    Just how big is fishing in Minnesota? Big enough that it contributes $4.7 billion to the state’s economy every year and attracts 1.4 million licensed anglers to Minnesota’s 11,842 lakes.

    Let’s fillet those numbers into more digestible morsels:

    If every licensed angler ventured out at the same time, each of Minnesota’s 11,842 lakes would have to accommodate 118 anglers.

    One out of every five Minnesotans fish, meaning that 1.1 million of Minnesota’s 5.2 million residents pick up a fishing pole at least once during the year … and that’s not counting youth.

    Minnesota ranks fourth among states with the highest number of anglers. The top three states are Florida, Texas and California. Wisconsin is fifth, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

    As a percentage of population among those states, Minnesota boasts the largest number of resident anglers at 28 percent and is tied nationally with Alaska for the largest participation of resident anglers.

    Anglers spend $2.8 billion on fishing each year in Minnesota, according to the American Sportfishing Association’s (ASA) Sportfishing in America survey.

    Dollars directly spent on fishing in Minnesota create an additional $1.9 billion in economic activity, boosting angling’s total statewide economic impact to $4.7 billion, according to the ASA’s Sportfishing in America survey.

    Equipment (rods, reels, line, boats, trailers, etc.) accounted for $1.2 billion of the $2.8 billion spent. Trip-related expenses accounted for $860 million. Other expenses such as bait and equipment rental accounted for $646 million, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS.

    Salaries, wages and business earnings directly related to fishing in Minnesota total $1.3 billion, according to the ASA’s Sportfishing in America survey.

    Fishing creates Minnesota 43,812 jobs, according to the ASA’ s Sportfishing in America survey.

    Minnesota angling generates $350 million in federal tax revenues and $342 million in state and local tax revenues, according to the ASA’s Sportfishing in America survey. In 2008, Minnesota fishing license sales generated $19 million in revenue.

    Just who are these anglers and where are they from:

    Most resident anglers - 755,000 of them in fact - are from the seven-county metropolitan area. The remaining 388,000 resident anglers live outside the Twin Cities, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS.

    Men account for 69 percent of resident anglers. Women account for 31 percent, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS.

    The highest percentage of participation comes in the 35-44 year old age group. Most of the remaining participants come from the 45-64 year old age group, with those 16-24 years old accounting for only 12 percent of the people who fish, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS. An estimated 40 percent of Minnesota anglers have household incomes of $50,000-$100,000. Households that make less than $50,000 annually account for 27 percent of Minnesota anglers, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS .

    An estimated 388,000 children ages 6-15 go fishing each year, with Twin Cities-area youth accounting for 76 percent of the total. More girls (52 percent) went fishing than boys (48 percent). Participation among age groups (6-8 years, 9-11 years and 12-15 years) remained fairly constant, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS.

    Finally, here's a look at where these resident anglers go and what they’re trying to hook:

    Significantly more time is spent fishing on lakes rather than rivers and streams, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS.

    The average Minnesota angler spends 20 days fishing each year, with 86 percent of resident anglers never fishing anywhere else but Minnesota, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS. Only 3 percent of Minnesota anglers try their luck on Lake Superior, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS.

    The most sought-after fish species, in order of preference, are walleye, bluegill, northern pike, crappie and bass, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS.

    Most resident anglers spend nearly half their time fishing for walleye and bluegill, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS.


    News Source: Minnesota DNR - Apr. 28, 2009

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